The American journal of cardiology, Volume 118, Issue 3, 14 May 2016, Pages 326-331 Prognostic Implications of Elevated Pulmonary Artery Pressure After ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction. Haeck ML, Hoogslag GE, Boden H, Velders MA, Katsanos S, Al Amri I, Debonnaire P, Schalij MJ, Vliegen HW, Bax JJ, Marsan NA, Delgado V

Elevated systolic pulmonary artery pressure (SPAP) after ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) has been associated with adverse outcome. However, little is known about the development of increased SPAP after STEMI treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention. The aims of this study were to investigate the incidence and determinants of elevated SPAP (SPAP ≥36 mm Hg at 12 months) after first STEMI and to analyze its prognostic implications. A total of 705 patients (60 ± 12 years; 75% men; left ventricular ejection fraction [LVEF] 47 ± 9%) with first STEMI treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention were evaluated. Two-dimensional echocardiography was available at baseline and 12-month follow-up. Data on all-cause mortality were collected at long-term follow-up. Incident elevated SPAP was present in 5% (n = 38) of patients. Patients with incident elevated SPAP were older (66 ± 12 vs 60 ± 11 years, p = 0.001), had more systemic hypertension (58% vs 30%, p <0.001) and lower LVEF (43 ± 9% vs 48 ± 8%, p <0.001) than their counterparts. Left atrial volume was larger (23 ± 11 vs 18 ± 6 ml/m(2), p = 0.006), and moderate to severe mitral regurgitation was more prevalent in patients with incident elevated SPAP (16% vs 7%, p = 0.05). Independent correlates of incident elevated SPAP at 12-month follow-up were age (odds ratio [OR] 1.04, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.08, p = 0.01), hypertension (OR 2.52, 95% CI 1.23 to 5.14, p = 0.01), baseline LVEF (OR 0.94, 95% CI 0.90 to 0.98, p = 0.003), and baseline left atrial volume (OR 1.08, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.12, p = 0.001). Incident elevated SPAP was independently associated with all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 3.84, 95% CI 1.76 to 8.39, p = 0.001). In conclusion, although the incidence of elevated SPAP after STEMI is low, its presence is independently associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality at follow-up.

Am J Cardiol. 2016 May;118(3):326-331